Sunday, April 22, 2018

YOU’LL LOVE “AS YOU LIKE IT” AT UCONN



BRALEY DEGENHARDT AS CELIA AND ALEX CAMPBELL AS ROSALIND
PHOTO BY GERRY GOODSTEIN


Are you an outdoor person? Are you fearless and daring?  Do you like adventure and are you a sucker for a good love story complete with complications?  Is Will Shakespeare one of your favorite playwrights? If you answered yes to all of the above, the Connecticut Repertory Theatre at the University of Connecticut has the perfect vehicle for your entertainment pleasure, but only until Sunday, April 29 at the Jorgensen Theatre, so hop right on it.


The merry woods of Arden Forest are welcoming you to forgo caution and run straight in for an amazing experience.  No need to pack camping equipment because everything is already there waiting for you to partake.  Here’s the deal.  Two pretty and sweet cousins Rosalind, an outstandingly gifted Alex Campbell, and Celia, a devoted Braley Degenhardt, find themselves unjustly banished to the forest by a mean spirited Duke Frederick (Jonathan Croy), Celia’s unreasonable papa.  He has already sent Rosalind’s father, his brother, off to ‘Arden after taking his estates and unfairly punishing him.  The court jester Touchstone, a versatile Nikolai Fernandez, accompanies them on their quest.

Once in the forest of Arden, Rosalind disguises herself as a lad Ganymede for protection. In that guise, she rediscovers a comely dude Orlando, a manly Nick Nudler, a youth she fell in love with while in Frederick’s court when he fought and defeated the Duke’s favorite fighter Charles (Anthony Giovino).  Not recognizing her, Orlando uses Ganymede  to practice on with his poems of love for Rosalind, which he prints on every tree. Meanwhile Touchstone gets giddy with the shepherd girl Audrey (Gillian Rae Pardi), she of the adorable lambs and goats, the maiden Phebe (Sierra Kane) is actively pursued by Silvius (Sebastian Nagpal) and even Celia finds romance in the unlikely arms of Oliver (Bryan Mittelstadt), Orlando’s not-so-nice brother.

Thanks to director Kristin Wold, the production is stuffed with imaginative and musical touches that make the Bard’s comedy especially memorable. For tickets ($31-35, student $10), call 860-486-2113 or go online at wwwcrt.uconn.edu. Performances are Wednesday and Thursday at 7:30 p.m., Friday at 8 p.m., Saturday at 2 p.m. and 8 p.m. and Sunday at 2 p.m.

In the pastoral pleasure fields of Arden Forest, you’re sure to discover the madness of love in all its varied complexions as traitors and teasers and poets and fools roam freely in merriment and mayhem that is sure to delight.


Monday, April 16, 2018

A STORY WITHIN A STORY IN “THE REVISIONIST” AT PLAYHOUSE ON PARK



CECILIA RIDDETT'S MARIA AND CARL HOWELL'S DAVID
PHOTO BY CURT HENDERSON
If you earn your living composing poetry, penning prose or dispensing literature, experiencing a writer’s block can be a crippling concern.  If your muse is gone and you’ve hit the wall, you might be desperate enough to try anything to coax the words back.  If you are a young American man named David, you might pack a bag, hop a plane and seek the inspiration of a complete change of scenery in the company of a relative even if you haven’t see her in decades,  That is what desperation can feel like.

West Hartford’s Playhouse on Park is encouraging you to climb into David’s head as you watch Jesse Eisenberg’s unusual journey “The Revisionist,” the New England premiere of a puzzling drama being offered until Sunday, April 29.  Carl Howell’s David has a deadline to meet and he’s already six weeks late.  He has rejected a cabin in the woods and writing retreats as possible solutions to his dilemma.  He must revise a science fiction book he has written, “Mindreader,” that comments on society and the real world. An escape , at a cousin’s small apartment in Poland, seems  to be the answer he seeks.

Cecilia Riddett’s Maria is ready to welcome David with open arms.  A little sprite of a woman, she craves family and can’t wait to spoil him with a roasted chicken dinner (he’s a vegetarian), a tour of the city (he’s too busy) and stories about all the family portraits that grace her walls (he knows none of their shared relatives).

To say David is ungrateful, selfish and rude and unappreciative of her efforts is an understatement, yet Maria cheerfully keeps trying.  She even invites her friend Zenon (Sebastian Buczyk) to come and help her in her desire to make David feel loved.  For a lady who holds family so dear, Maria finds it hard to understand David’s apathy.  She is delighted he has “come to bring blood back into the house,” and she is even kind to the telemarketers who continually call on the phone,

Sasha Bratt directs this intriguing encounter that reveals who the true revisionist is in the stories being told.  For tickets ($25-40), call Playhouse on Park, 244 Park Road, West Hartford at 860-623-5900 ext 10 or online at www.PlayhouseOnPark.org.  Performances are Wednesday and Thursday at 7:30 p.m., Friday and Saturday at 8 p.m. and Sunday at 2 p.m.
Upcoming events include a Play Reading on Tuesday, April 24 ($10),  the 19th Annual Mayor’s Charity Ball on Saturday, May 12, a cool kids musical “Polkadots” May 12-20, a Comedy Night on Saturday, May 19 ($15) and a Young Professionals Night Out onThursday, June 28 from 6-7 p.m. ($20) during the running of “In the Heights” (June 13-July 29). 

You may find yourself revising the whole meaning of your family members after a visit with David and Maria and Zenon.  A stiff glass of vodka may help.

TIME IS TICKING FOR THE LEONARDO CHALLENGE APRIL 26


    

                SUSAN CLINARD'S INTERNAL CALENDAR
   


DELARI JOHNSTON AND KEITH MURRAY'S THE TIME WARP CREW
Alice in Wonderland’s friend the White Rabbit  was often heard muttering “I’m late, I’m late, for a very important date.” In this case, the date in question is Thursday, April 26 and the time to arrive is 5:30 p.m.  The occasion is the 24th Annual Leonardo Challenge which this year is the intriguing query “Capturing Time.”

Time is an elusive quantity, but how would our world and our lives operate without it? We wear watches, we wake to alarm clocks, we measure moments and minutes practically 24/7, we refer to the sun and the moon to distinguish day from night.  We even manipulate sunlight and darkness twice a year with Daylight Saving Time.

The Eli Whitney Museum and Workshops, 915 Whitney Avenue, Hamden is encouraging one hundred artists from across the country to explore the fascinating dimensions of time in a myriad of creative ways by designing a piece of jewelry, a mobile, a toy, a painting, an article of clothing, a chair or table, all to honor that greatest of inventors Leonardo da Vinci and, at the same time, raise valuable funds for children’s scholarships and year round educational activities to hopefully produce the inventive and spirited minds of the future.

According to Sally Hill, the museum’s Associate Director and designer of each year’s invitation and exhibit displays,  "We realized early on, that artists almost always 'solved' the Challenge in their own 'language.'Painters painted, sculptors worked 3 dimensionally, photographers used their cameras...etc.This theme of time, it's tricky. It's just gigantic if you try to look at it in general. But if you  think of it in terms of how you personally experience time, we hoped it would be manageable. And people will come up with all kinds of things you'd might not consider –  perhaps ever – in your own experience.''

She has already received a few entries to this year’s program,  a sublime piece from Susn Clinard, Internal Calendar and four Dolls from the Rocky Horror Show, The Time Warp, a pure joyous piece contributed by Delari Johnston and Keith Murray.  According to Sally Hill, these two pieces accurately describe the whimsical nature of the evening.  Sally, herself always submits a lamp and another contribution to the event, one she usually collaborates with another artist to complete.

While single tickets are $75, categories exist for more generous supporters from Galileo at $250 to the Doctor at $5000, each with appropriate incentives to participate.  For more information, call the museum at 203-777-1833 or go online at www,eliwhitney,.org.

Culinary delights will be courtesy of Doug Coffin’s Kitchen and the Big Green Truck Pizza, the delicious cheeses from the fromagerie Caseas, the old world creations of Whole G’s artisan bakers, the organic fare of Small Kitchen, Big Taste, and the libations from Caseus’s Blackhog Brewery and Koffee and special Koffee cocktails.

These can all be enjoyed while you explore all the timeless creations by the artists that you can bid on and, hopefully, taken home.  All the entries will be on display for the public for two weeks after the fundraising party.

Tick Tock. Tick Tock.

Thursday, April 12, 2018

CT GAY MEN’S CHORUS MUSICALLY SALUTES MEN AND BOYS




It’s not just Rice Krispies that snap, crackle and pop. The Connecticut Gay Men’s Chorus has the same grooves, sparkle and sizzle and its upcoming spring concert is no exception. The Theater of the CoOp located in the Cooperative Arts and Humanities High School at 177 College Street in New Haven will be the exuberant site of its latest and greatest, a tribute to the iconic and favorite boy bands of recent momentum and memory.

On Saturday, April 28 at 8 p.m. and Sunday, April 29 at 4 p.m., this delightful guy group will salute “Oh Boy!: The Best of the Boy Bands.” Whether you swoon over The Five Satins or The Jackson Five, Boys ii Men or The Back Street Boys, NSYNC or One Direction, The Jonas Brothers or The Beatles, the CGMC’s dance card is sure to be filled with some if not all of your greatest hits.

According to Artistic Director Greg McMahan, “Our boy band theme has allowed us to explore an incredible variety of musical genres - a gorgeous, heartbreaking ballad one minute followed by an infectious pop song that you grew up with  that you can’t get out of your head!  I know our audiences will gasp with delight to hear their favorites being recreated live on stage by our performers.  I mean, what other chance do you get to hear a Monkees favorite on the same bill with one of Ricky Martin’s megabits?  There’s definitely something for everyone!”

For tickets ($25-30), call the CGMC at 203-777-2923 or online at www.ctgmc.org.

Imagine a three or five member boy band magically expand in volume to a chorus of 30 members strong as these guys croon their hearts and souls out to bring you pleasure. With the moves and the music and the male mojo, this creative reunion of the best of the best is sure to be “one sweet day” with “no strings attached” that will go “step by step” to guarantee “they’ll make it beautiful."


OPERA THEATER OF CT PRESENTS LOVE TRIANGLE



The stage is set for murder, fueled by jealousy and infidelity, in a dramatic opera narrated by a clown.  Opera Theater of Connecticut will present Ruggero Leoncavallo’s “I Pagliacci,” originally performed in Milan in 1892.  Now set in the Little Italy section of a large American city, it will be 
filled with passion and problems of the heart at the Andrews Memorial Theater, 54 East Main Street, Clinton on Friday, April 20 at 7:30 p.m. and Saturday, April 21 at 3 p.m.

Opera Theater of CT is now expanding its programming to the spring.  Kyle Swann will conduct with Jill Brunelle on piano. Sung in Italian with English supertitles projected overhead, prepared by Artistic Director Alan Mann, Mann will also offer a special half hour Opera Talk before each performance at 60 minutes before curtain that is sure to enhance your understanding and enjoyment of the piece.

Daniel Juarez, tenor, will play the jealous husband Canio who suspects his wife Nedda, performed by soprano Rachele Schmiege, of being unfaithful to him.  Luke Scott will sing the role of Tonio, a baritone, the clown an unsuccessful lover who seeks revenge and plots murder while Silvio will be Nedda’s consummate love interest in the hands of Zachary Johnson, baritone. Tenor Jorge Prego takes the role of Beppe, the manager of this group of clowns.

Come and be caught up in the intrigue of the traveling group of performers  and the real life traumas that weave themselves in their theatrical stories.  For tickets ($30, under 18 $10 and $5 for the Opera Talk), call Opera Theater of CT at 860-669-8999 or fax the office at 860-669-6616 or go online and complete the ticket order form at www. operatheaterofct.org and fax it in to the office.

Let yourself enjoy this commanding work that features a dynamic “verismo” repertoire, with pieces like the Bell Chorus, the melodic Intermezzo and the moving “Vesti la giubba” or “Laugh, Clown, Laugh.” 

Monday, April 9, 2018

LINGERIE ON DISPLAY IN “NANA’S NAUGHTY KNICKERS”




LORI FELDMAN,  KAREN GAGLIARDI AND ASHLEY AYALA

Very few things are as private as your underwear.  What you put on under your clothes is basically your business.  But to senior citizen Sylvia Charles her business is getting to the bottom of things, from your knickers to your knockers, in silk or feathers, satin or lace, and she is proud to be so intimately involved in your life.  This feisty and innovative lady doesn’t want to play bridge or take a walk in the park.  Now widowed, she wants to raise a few eyebrows and a few bucks and have a little frisky fun in the process.

To make Sylvia’s acquaintance, head over to the Connecticut Cabaret Theatre in Berlin for an intimate introduction to Katherine DiSavino’s comic “Nana’s Naughty Knickers” playing weekends  until Saturday, May 5th.  Lori Feldman’s innovative Sylvia has managed to keep her enterprising activities private, away from the prying eyes of her best friend Vera, a nosy but hard of hearing Karen Gagliardi, her good friend Police Officer Tom, a helpful Josh Luszczak, and her landlord Mr Schmidt, an interferring Dave Wall who would like nothing better than to find a good cause to evict her
 from her rent controlled apartment.

Everything is under control and working well until the arrival of her granddaughter Bridget, a questioning Ashley Ayala, who gets quickly suspicious of her nana’s unusual activities. As a law school student, Bridget quickly suspects that Nana is hiding a big secret, one that is kinky as well asillegal and she wants it to stop.  When the UPS men, Chase Fish and Russell Fish, start delivering packages of sex objects and a model Heather, a scantily clad Melissa Pelletier, arrives at the door, Bridget realizes she must act quickly before Officer Tom hauls Nana off to jail for tax evasion and Mr Schmidt discovers the perfect excuse to evict her for breaking her lease.

Luckily the arrival of Nana’s best customer Claire, a commanding Linda Kelly, arrives in the knick of time to save the day.  Kris McMurray has a lot of fun frolicking among the intimate apparel to great comic relief.  For tickets ($30), call the CT Cabaret  Theatre, 31 Webster Square Road, Berlin at 860-829-1248 or online at www.ctcabaretct.com.  Performances are Friday and Saturday nights at 8 p.m., with doors opening at 7:15 p.m. Bring goodies to share at your table or plan to buy them at the concession stand onsite.

Wear your fancy inner wear and your red or pink boas so you’ll feet right at home at Nana’s  ingenious take on the old fashioned Tupperware parties of old.  

SEVEN ANGELS THEATRE OFFERING UP “SECOND CHANCE”


MARINA RE'S VIOLET FLIRTS WITH PAUL D'AMATO''S JACK IN "SECOND CHANCE"

Parents spend a lifetime helping to guide and nourish their offspring from new born baby to fully grown adults.  They never stop caring and insinuating their advice, whether welcomed or not.  What happens, however, when the bassinet is turned and the child becomes the keeper of the reins, the one who wants and needs to call the shots, when the parent is in need of help.  How resistant or accepting will the parent be to receiving advice from the child.  If the parent is a cantankerous and opinionated Jack Korman, the ruler of his own destiny for seventy seven years, he will be resentful of any guidance his son Larry has to offer.

To witness the contretemps that blossom between the two men, mosey on over to the Seven Angels Theatre in Waterbury to see whose side you’ll take in Mike Vogel’s comedy “Second Chance” until Sunday, April 29.  Larry feels his dad needs to make changes in his living arrangements.  After living for fifty years in the same apartment and being widowed for some time, Jack is set in his ways.  He lives for the Yankees and resents Larry interfering in his life style.  Paul D’Amato’s Jack has no desire to change any thing, especially not to move into an assisted living facility.  Jack Lafferty’s Larry is equally determined that his dad will change his residence and tricks him into agreeing to try out the new facility for a week.

Enter Marina Re’s Violet a spunky and sassy Welcoming Committee who literally sweeps Jack onto the dance floor and agreeing to move over in bed.  With a ratio of 4 to 1, Jack is quickly in hot demand, much to the dismay of Warren Kelley’s Chet who deeply resents the new competition. Amanda Kristin Nichols’ Malka is a young nurse in the building who also has unique services to offer the newly arrived resident.  Soon Jack is ready to admit he might have been wrong about relocating but lots of complications arise to make this a rocky road of decisions. Russell Treyz directs this foray into retirement life that ventures onto rough seas before it can level off into smooth sailing.

For tickets ($42-58), call Seven Angels Theatre, 1 Plank Road, Waterbury at 203-757-4676 or online at www.sevenangelstheatre.org.  Performances are Thursday at 2 p.m. and 8 p.m., Friday at 8 p.m., Saturday at 2 p.m. and8 p.m. and Sunday at 2 p.m.

Watch how a feeding frenzy of women setting their sights on newcomer Jack help him adjust to his new surroundings and make his transition to retirement life all the easier and more fun.  Soon Jack is hitting his own homeruns, without any help from his beloved Yankees.